Five things you didn't know about dads.

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Five things you didn't know about dads.

This Father’s Day, as we celebrate the dads in our lives, we’re also exploring some of the little-known facts that make them even more special. Here are five tidbits you may not be aware of about those priceless papas.

Dads would love to spend more time with kids if given the opportunity. A Pew Research Study found that 63% believe they spend too little time with their little ones. Even though men are spending more time than ever with their families, it’s still not enough.

And they're doing so more and more. In fact, comparing data from 2011 to 2000, men, on average, spent a half hour more with their children per week. Those extra moments add up, and this upward trend may suggest there is change in the air when it comes to traditional gender roles in families.

Dads care about their work-life balance. One study found that, in fact, men are more likely than women to take advantage of their paid and unpaid leave, flexible schedules and childcare entitlements. Oh, and men who take longer leaves are found to take on a greater part of childcare later on, have better relationships with their children, and are more understanding with their partners.

Being a dad can make you smile more. Millennial dads are significantly happier than their single male counterparts. Parenting can definitely be tough, but a family can be an important support system, and kids are great sources of entertainment.

Splitting traditional gender roles can also contribute to dads' wellbeing. Because it turns out another thing that makes dads happy is not having to earn the bulk of the money for the family. All that “breadwinner” rhetoric can be stressful.

Dads, we see you, and we want you to know how much we appreciate everything you do. Oh, and just so you all know, guys with these names are - apparently - the most likely to become dads this year. If you happen to see one today, feel free to pass on the good news. Happy Father’s Day!

Ali Feldhausen is a writer, illustrator, and advocate for care work, basically all the work done in the home. Not yet a mama, she hopes to use her passion for this field to create both policy and individual level changes that help everyone be happier and healthier.

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Friday Five

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Friday Five

In case you've been (justifiably) too distracted by Oprah's royal kumquats to think about anything else this week, here are five reads to get you back up to speed:

  1. Only one woman was allowed into the historic nuclear talks between the USA and North Korea this week. Which is a bummer, in light of the proven importance of diversity to making diplomacy work.
  2. Argentina may be about to ease up its restrictive abortion laws, as a bill to legalize abortion up to 14 weeks makes its way from the Chamber of Deputies into the Argentine Senate.
  3. After reviewing thousands of pages of court documents and public records, the New York Times reports that from Walgreens to Wall Street, many of the country's largest companies continue to systemically pass over pregnant women for promotions and raises and fire them when they complain.
  4. White House reporters wanted to know whether being a parent gave press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders empathy for what other parents are going through at the border. She changed the subject.
  5. Iranian men attending their national team's first World Cup game protested the ongoing ban that prohibits women from going to soccer matches in Iran.

And that's a wrap on the week! If you're in NYC, you're running out of chances to join us on Tuesday at Ribalta in Union Square. We'll be talking to the UN World Food Programme, celeb chefs and special guests about how families can lead the world to zero hunger, just by making some small tweaks to how we shop and eat. (PS there will be Neapolitan pizza and beer brewed from bread, so... see you there.)

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Pregnancy mythbusters: the mani-pedi edition

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Pregnancy mythbusters: the mani-pedi edition

You know what the world doesn't need? More uncertainty about what you can and can't do during pregnancy and beyond. So Mindr is on the case, separating fiction from fact when it comes to pregnancy and parenting do's and don'ts. First up: Bump Bestie's Molly Pross has the dish on whether that mani-pedi that your sanity needs even more than your nails gets a manicured thumbs up or a toxic thumbs down.

MYTH: You must forego your mani-pedi from the moment you become pregnant until the day your children can vote, because of the harmful toxins in the polish.

FACT: While it would take massive and long-term exposure to the chemical products in your nail polish for there to be a problem, many pregnant people and new parents (and anyone, really!) may feel better going to “healthier” nail salons that use non-toxic products.

Know the facts

It’s true that there can be some nasty chemicals lurking behind your fave shade of millennial pink.

There are three chemical culprits in particular that you probably want to avoid: formaldehyde, toluene and dibutyl phthalate (DBP), are known as the “Toxic Trio.” They help stop your polish from chipping and cracking, but they’ve been linked to all sorts of problems, from reproductive issues to cancer.

So what is a girl to do who enjoys the luxury of a mani-pedi? Thankfully, in the last few years, watchdogs in the cosmetic industry have blown the whistle on toxic chemical exposure in nail salons. Detoxing your mani-pedi routine is now much easier, thanks to non-toxic nail polish options and new salons and studios that have gone a step further to keep their products and services chemical-free.

Nail polish manufacturers have caught on and health-conscious brands now boast what they lack. Most polishes on the market forego the Toxic Trio, making them “three-free,” but there are a number of newer companies creating 5-free, 8-free and even 10-free polishes that address other potentially harmful ingredients like camphor and zylene.

Go green

Non-toxic or health-conscious nail salons are popping up in major cities across the U.S. to provide a safer pampering experience. Whether or not you're headed to a "green salon," pick one with good ventilation or request a chair closest to the front door. If you’re on a budget (green salons are typically 2-3x more expensive), creating your own kit is a great option to minimize exposure. Some products you might want to consider putting in your kit include:

  • An organic hand and body lotion like @avalonorganics
  • An oil-based nail polish remover like one from @karmaorganicspa
  • A non-toxic base coat, polish and topcoat - you can click to check out some of the brands I like below
  • A salt scrub like @calilylife

Here's a little roundup of my fave non-toxic polishes currently on the market:

 
 

What about gels?

Ideally, skip them unless you have access to healthier gels like Bio Seaweed Gel or NCLA. The compounds in gel formulas can be potentially toxic to you and Baby. Gel polishes can be absorbed through your nail bed and unlike regular nail polish; gel nails have to be in contact with acetone for an extended period of time to remove the gel. There is very little information about how safe this is during pregnancy, so when in doubt, you may want to just skip it.

Keep those cuticles.

One last thing - try and avoid getting your cuticles cut. Reducing the risk of bleeding means reducing the risk of getting a nasty infection. While you might get side-eye from someone next to you or get some pushback from your technician - you’ll feel better knowing you’ve limited your exposure to germs and chemicals!

Passionate about supporting families after having her son, Britton, #MINDRMAMA Molly Pross founded Bump Bestie, an LA-based baby planning, gear consulting and maternity concierge service to help expecting and new families navigate the overwhelming world of all things baby. With the many decisions that come with starting a family, Molly’s made it her mission to inspire a community around safety, eco/green parenting and health and wellness so that families experience a more connected, calm and satisfying journey to parenthood.

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